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angeles daily news." that is all for the program, thank you for joining us. we will now go to the senate homeland security and government affairs committee where chairman lieberman is going to be hosting a meeting about the ongoing threats. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . >> i was struck yesterday by reading a gallup poll in one of the newspapers that showed a significant decrease in concern about terrorism among the american people. now, this is understandable, particularly because of the stress that current economic conditions have put so many american families under, but as the three witnesses know very well, the threat is still all too real. our committee knows that as well. it's our job and yours to be focused on protecting our homeland and our people from violent extremist and terrorists no matter what the state of public opinion is about it at the moment, and that's why, of course, we are so happy that -- and grateful that you are here today. the tragedy of 9/11 is a daily reality for the three of y
in the investigation and recovery efforts are with us in the audience today. for the first responders, around -- a round of applause. [applause] this is also the place where the media gave the nation and the world their first glimpse of the crash site. this is the place where a community in nation came together, the red cross and salvation army and good samaritans demonstrated great compassion and care here. local residents of this community and county opened their home andeart to the families and to the nation. a small memorial of pay bills was placed at the overlook where families could leave -- of hay bales was placed at the overlook where families could leave flowers and other items. still adding we're to that simple memorial. the nation in the world have joined the salute. you will hear from distinguished speakers today. i want to impart with you the confidence that the department of the interior, in our capacity as to words of national parks and historic sites for our great nation, is committed to building this memorl. because of the work here, we're on our way, with the friends and fam
with the till look -- tillamook burn. never. we used to have a very high rate of employment, with a relatively high average, annual salary when the mills were operating. we no longer have mills. what in the hell are we doign to this -- doing to this state? >> do you want to share any thoughts on the east side forest plan my colleague has been trying to put together to get out of this deadlock? >> it all works soemtimes. -- sometimes. but every time that something gets going, it goes to the courts. we are stymied. >> thank you very much. whenever i am hiding in that area, you often see -- hiking in that area, you often see completely overgrown, second- growth forests that are not serving their purpose and are often a source of disease, a potential fire hazard. it is a lose-lose-lose situation. there are a number of things that we need to push forward on. one is the thinning which produces a steady supply of logs, better timber stands, and improves the ecosystem. nothing moves past in this world, but another piece was -- senator wyden and i thought to get money to help for us to thinning. a seco
for being with us on this friday. let's tell you what we're doing next. we will take you to the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c. and the panel session that looks at what we have learned nine years after the 9/11 attacks. there is an evolving terrorist threat and there will be several speakers. live coverage begins shortly. thank you for being with us on this friday morning and we will see to morning -- tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. on "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> we are leave at this national press club this morning where former 9/11 commission lee hamilton and tom cane will speak with reporters about how terrorist threats have changed since 9/11. the two are now co-chairs of the national security preparedness group of the bipartisan policy center. it's an organization founded three years ago by former senate majority leader tom daschle. bob dole, georg
'll be back at 7:00 eastern time, thank you for joining us. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >>. what's in 2007, analysts meredith whitney was the first to predict major losses for citigroup. she said -- our guest tonight on c-span's q&a. >> next, a discussion on the image of muslims in the u.s.. some of the topics are the controversy over the proposed islamic center near ground zero in york city. it is an hour and half. >> we welcome you to our briefing. and we have a distinguished panel year before you to talk about -- we call it a discussion. i want to be clear that this briefing is not about park 51. none of the panelists here are experts on the project or connected directly. this is not about park 51. the congressional muslim the staff association does not necessarily endorse the positions of the panelists here. we want to bring together experts and community leaders to talk about conversations in the wake of this controversy that is taking place all across america. it is a complex conversation that we're having right now. the muslim staff association represents a
%. if i may proud independence. -- i'm a proud independent. if you look at our infrastructure, who uses mass transit more -- middle class, lower class, or upper class? i would say is middle or lower. guest: certainly, it depends on where you are. the certainly, the average bus- writer in america has a slightly lower income -- the average bus rider in america has a slightly lower income than the average american household. however, the express between fort worth and dallas, for example, it tends to be middle and upper income the use that. across america, all strata of society use public transportation and depending on where the transit goes and what type of transit it is combined with the market is that they are seeking to reach, it could be of -- it could be either very high income, that is with the commuter rail lines in new york or chicago or san francisco are an example of. it can be no american income americans going back and forth -- it can be middle-class american income going back and forth to work. it is a wide spectrum of people that use public transit. when i give these statis
that were donated to us. these were original patents that were provided. some of them date back to the early 1800's. is a reminder of what makes this country so great, our inventiveness. are originally there were a bunch of plates up there and i decided i have the whole plate room so i don't need another one year. >> do you have but george washington year? >> i kept george washington, i have a brown blanket. this was donated by steven spielberg to the -- i have abraham lincoln. this was donated by steven spielberg to a bill clinton. it is by norman rockwell. you have these guys cleaning the torch. it is a reminder that we constantly have to renew the flames of our democracy. >> when people come in this room, how do you notice them react? >> well, you know, somebody said this is the greatest home court advantage you have in this office. i think people feel a certain reverence for this space, because it symbolizes the presidency and it symbolizes what has been extraordinary record of tough tough decision -- of tough decisions and monumental decisions made in this room. usually people have a bi
, is the u.s. still making any use of military bases and oman as in the past? >> i think we have military cooperation with oman, as we do with many countries, but i will defer the specifics to the pentagon. >> do you have any comment on the new japanese foreign minister? will the secretary have a bilateral meeting with him next week? >> we appreciated his many contributions to the u.s.-japan alliance and his role as foreign minister and we look for to working with him in his new capacity as general secretary of the dpj, and we will continue to work closely with the government of japan and the foreign minister across a broad range of issues between our nations. i am confident there will be high level meetings with japan coming up next week, but i will defer it to announcements that others will make on specifics of the bilaterals. >> we were just told before you got up here you would be making the announcement. >> no, no, there are some meetings the secretary will have, some that the president will have. >> can you go through the secretary's meetings as they are scheduled? >> we are relucta
." join us with your calls, e- mail's end tweets next sunday at noon eastern on c-span3 book tv. >> now, the washington institute for near east policy post a discussion on leadership of the oilseeds of saddam hussein. documents were captured in iraq in 2003 and provided scholars with an inside view of the iraqi regime _ sought -- saddam hussein's leadership. they have archived the materials. this is about 1.5 hours. >> good afternoon ladies and gentleman. my name is michael eisenstaedt. i am a senior fellow and director of the studies program at the washington institute of near east policy. almost three years to the day this week marks the start of the iraq war. it led to a series of events in a bloody eight year war between iran and iraq which contributed to the 1991 gulf war which in turn set up a decade of sanctions and containment of iraq followed by the 2003 invasion of iraq by the united states and its coalition partners which leads us to where we are today. one of the consequences of the invasion of iraq was that the united states government's possession of massive numbers of gov
cleared, the loss was actually greater. all of us can remember where we were, what we were doing, and how we felt as the news of the attacks was broadcast over all of the news networks. most of us had the opportunity to experience those attacks through our televisions, most in the privacy of our own homes, where we were able to take in and process, and grieve over what was occurring. the people that we will be talking with today did not have that luxury of learning about the events on their televisions. these were the individuals that were on the front lines that day. they were the men and women who could not watch it on tv, but had to respond. they had to act. they had no time to grieve. they had no time to plan. they had no time to prepare. we had not prepared for what happened that day. they were called upon to improvise. their actions and their decisions could either cost lives or save lives. for me, as an airline pilot, the was not flying that day, i had a burning desire to understand what it was like for these people that were in the air traffic control facility, and the cockpit, an
he will embrace the notion and he his republic c >> the u.s. senate returned from their summer break. the nomination is scheduled at 5:30 p.m. eastern. the chamber returns to work and small-business lending bill that has been stalled since midsummer. follow the senate live on c-span 2. and the house returns from its summer recess tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern for legislative business. they will take up a handful of bills under suspension of the rules. those are scheduled for 6:00 p.m. eastern. tomorrow, members will take a resolution honoring the ninth anniversary of 9/11. on wednesday, they will work on a couple of measures designed to boost domestic manufacturing and a bill dealing with energy efficiency programs for rural areas. watch live house covered starting tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> with the house and senate back in session, followed congress using the cspan video library congressional chronicle. beginning cadets a complete -- you can index a complete list of congressional members. it is free any time. watch you what you want, when you want. >> the people who
recent recession that demonstrates the u.s. is very strong in its reaction to the cheonan incident. they joined at the very beginning in the rescue operations, and also, [unintelligible] -- the were in strong support of the u.s. administration. this is the largest area ever conducted in the caribbean peninsula. -- kirby and peninsula. i might say that this is the reincarnation of the incident that happened between 1977 and 1993. it was a deterrent to north korean leadership and rain that in north korean policies -- north korean policies. one side effect of this is china's reaction. when we conducted this exercise in the wake of the cheonan sinking, the chinese reaction was unusually harsh. i think it has awakened at the international community. it is central in the war, as reflected in the sense of china. china had some objection to this joint exercise. for example, july 15 -- "we formally oppose any foreign militaries placed in the yellow city, undermining china's security." and second also, this was a joint week emphasized by a high- ranking military -- this was a jointly emphasi
state. the q4000 is used to lift the blowout preventer. why are we using it? the reason we are doing it is because when it was brought and originally, it was to operate the manifold on the see that what -- seabed that allowed us to do this static -- excuse me, a dynamic attempt at the top killed. altman we did that by pumping mud and cement into that show client heard before that, we were having to kill the choke line with the q4000. it was never intended to be the primary lifting device. the reason we are using it is, on deck, it has the electrical connections and a computer that run the yellow pdod, which is the control pod that runs the hydraulic lines and vowels and operate the blowout preventer from the surface. we married the yellow pod with the q4000 at the start of the response. because of that, we are excepting some limitations on what they can do compared to what the "discover enterprise," can do. is the response of? >> yes. [unintelligible] do you see that as anything that might affect the response? >> i do not. >> thank you. >> i was wondering if you could talk about what
this morning is what is america's core competency in your mind. if you would like to tell us how that can be nurtured by our leaders, we would like to hear that as well where we are going to get to your calls right away if we can get our producers to get some calls on the line while we are talking to you about america's core competency. we went to wikipedia which, as you know, is the self edited by people all rumble world really -- all are around the world really. we want to give you some statistics about the united states for its land mass. over 3.79 million square miles. 300 million people. the united states is the third or fourth largest country by a total area and the third largest both by land area of population. it is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multi- cultural nations, the product of a large-scale immigration from many countries. the u.s. economy is the world's largest national gdp of $14.30 trillion and a quarter of the nominal global gdp and one-fifth of the gdp at purchasing power parity. that is the size and the economics of the united states. one of the poss
. we had to fly over that. we had to make our own rules. it was pretty incredible. the decision for us in the washington area to get everyone down on the ground was a quick one. my supervisor made the decision on his own. it was a great decisn. that part of our job was done. the big part was setting up a fighter cap and identifying all of the other aircraft and things coming and going in the air space. was really an incredible few hours. >> you mentioned a couple of years back in the circumstance stuck with me. during this time as you have all the fighters over the city, you are breaking all of theules. you had created your own rules on howou operate this day. there was an aircraft coming into d.c. -- obviously a government aircraf you have determined how you were going to thread it through all the fighters circling the city. your supervisor walked into the room. >> when the attorney general is coming in, that is a different story. we will get to that if we have time. we did not know who it was. andrews aiforce base was recovering military leaders to go in there and do what they had to
a reporter, i am all about news you can use. on this panel, we have hand- selected amazing folks, each an expert in the runway on different angles of reintegration within the military and the civilian world. i am going to bounce around a little bit. out of courtesy, i like to start with our wounded warriors. front and center, we have michael. he is a recently retired wounded warrior. he has a long medical road ahead. as a former army ranger and sergeant first class, michael is adapting to this change in mission. between ongoing surgery's, he is speaking to troops about reintegration and suicide prevention, even going back to iraq, where he was hit by an ied to talk to troops. optimisticht iis his mother and full-time caregiver. they have been blessed because she says when you look at mike, she worries about those who have unseen injuries and their families in need help reintegrating. down on me and, we have -- down on the end, we have a former marine reservist. she brings a unique perspective on reintegration trade as a female wounded warrior, as a full-time student, and as eight men t
religion within america is part of an exclusive club. this exploitation of the truth that is used for political purposes since this is now an election year, and the fact is, most americans are the easiest targets. they are an easy punching bag. we do not have the reach. we do not have a lobby. we do not have a p r infrastructure. the other side obviously has the microphone. my mentor always said something that is very telling for us as muslims as well as for americans and people. the world is not divided into muslims, christians, and jews. the world is divided into stupid people and intelligent people. >> on that note, who wants to be the first u.s. question? [laughter] raise your hand and we will have the gentleman with the microphone, for. >> we've discussed this in the past. while we know that the great majority of muslims embrace and endorse the founding principles of the united states and want to be good americans, unfortunately there are people who do not. they profess to be acting in the name of islam. one of the difficulties it seems to me is that there's no central author
security. u.s. troops pulled out last summer. iraqi forces had moved into the lead with considerable skill and commitment to their fellow citizens. even as they continue to suffer terrorist attacks, security infancies have been near the lowest on record since the war began. iraqi forces had taken the fight to al qaeda. this year sell iraq called incredible elections i drew a strong turnout. a caretaker administration is in place. tonight i encourage the leaders to move forward with a sense of urgency in coming to form a government that is just representative and accountable to the iraqi people. there should be no doubt that the people will have a strong partner in the united states. going forward, and the transitional force of u.s. troops will remain in iraq with a different mission. they will support iraqi troops in targeted counter-terrorism missions and protecting our civilians. a consistent with our agreement with the government come on u.s. troops will leave by the end of next year as our military draws down, are dedicated civilians are moving into the lead to support iraq as a result
political settlement. what makes us think that we can make some progress now? that is really only very recently that all the necessary elements of the campaign have come together. despite the fact that there have been western forces there since 2001, it is only rarely now that the necessary number of forces are deployed in afghanistan, as general petraeus has recently been making clear. one of our announcements had been a 40% increase in the development going to afghanistan. we have an economic protests that that is bought out by the afghans themselves. all these things have come together in recent times. the single most difficult problem we have faced in international affairs, but i think now we have the finest military minds, a good military plan, the necessary quantities of development and the experience of provincial reconstruction, and motivated key ministers in afghanistan, to have the best chance for success that it is possible to put together. i believe is right to maintain an effort to succeed, because i think the consequences of abandoning that effort now would be extremely s
-- the department of defense leaders, not by the service chiefs, a process that was supposed to inform us with one that merely ratifies a politically-driven decision. we all fall or to hearing your thoughts about whether the comprehensive review should be allowed to run its course in this fashion, and what you feel about the affected could have on the united states marine corps. we also look forward to hearing your professional military advice about what policy is best for your branch of our armed services, the effectiveness and readiness of which you will be entrusted with maintaining at the highest levels if confirmed in this position. today our military continues to be engaged in combat operations, and career officers, in ceo's, and their families, are being asked to do so much. it would be a mistake to ignore the views of our troops and the military advice of the service chiefs, and for the senate to act prematurely to repeal the tariff don't ask, don't tell law for the sake of fulfilling a political promise. i look for to the testimony of general amos today, and i again thank him and his fami
. and anthony placido on the use of u.s. intelligence gathering. later religious leaders from the christian, muslim faith will talk about religious tolerance in the u.s. live coverage begins at 1:00 eastern. . >> is good to be in milwaukee. it is good to be here. i am almost home. [cheers and applause] i just hop on the '94 and i am home. [cheers and applause] its is good to be here on such a beautiful day. happy labor day, everybody. [cheers and applause] i want to say thank you to the milwaukee area labor council and all of my brothers and sisters in the afl-cio for inviting me to spend this day with you. [cheers and applause] this is a day that belongs to the working men and women of america. i want to acknowledge your president,g national presenc and a man who knows that a strong economy needs a strong labor movement. [cheers and applause] thank you to the president of the wisconsin afl-cio, the secretary of the treasure. [cheers and applause] happy birthday, sheila. [cheers and applause] i am proud to be here with our secretary of labor, a daughter of a union member, held the soleus, a
others to move with us. a little background. the threat. it is changing. since the end of the cold war, while the chances of an all-out global nuclear war have declined significantly, thank god, i think the chances of a nuclear strike have increased. during the cold war, the american, nato, and soviet military's were diligent and professional in the way we handle our nuclear-weapons. but we were also very lucky. we had several near misses, including but not limited to the cuban missile crisis. if we think that our luck will hold out with nine nuclear states and growing, plus the spread of technology to enrich the new clear -- and rich uranium, i think the world must think i knew. nine countries have nuclear weapons now. more are seeking them. terrorists are seeking nuclear weapons and nuclear. -- and i have no doubt that certain groups would use them if they had them. the know-how and capability to build a nuclear weapon is widely available, something we thought would only be the province of nations years ago. but it has changed. with the goal of nuclear power, and we will be talking a
. this is what you do. you get a cross-section. you use certain techniques. thes is no different than surveys in terms of methodologies that the surveys you read all of the time. if it is our true that our survey does not represent the pulte -- the population, then a new survey does either. regarding the question about civil unions, i think that is a very interesting question. many people say i am opposed to marriage. that conveys and means something different. there is a difference between marriage and a civil union. one difference is a very simple one. if you are married, you are in a different tax rate because you are a married couple. if you are in a civil union you are not. ironically, in many cases not being married is a financially beneficial. ironically, by not allowing same-sex couples to get married we are not getting the same taxes from them that we would get. about the 2% vs. the 98%, it has never been a question of what is the largest percentage of people and just benefiting them. the united states has always been concerned about both those with power and those without power. we
's clear that many of us, an many in our audience are just coming off of summer vacation. yesterday at the state department, felt a little bit like the first day of school. everyone showed up for our morning meeting, and looking a lot healthier than they did when they left. and it is also obvious that there isn't any rest for any of us. the events of the past few weeks have kept us busy. we are working to support direct talks between the israelis and the palestinians, and nexteek, i will travel to egypt and jerusalem for the second round of these negotiations. in iraq, where our combat mission has ended, we are transferring and transitioning to an unprecedented civilian-led partnership. we are stepping up international pressure on iran to negotiate seriously on its nuclear program. we are working with pakistan as it recovers from devastating floods and continues to combat violent extremism an of course, the war in afghanistan is always at the top of our minds as well as our agenda. now, none of these challenges exist in ice lags. -- isolation. consider the middle east peace talks. a
. >> there was a column this week called, "a superpower super broke," talking about the u.s. it is estimated that there are about two hundred al-qaeda agents. >> how many? >> 200-300. >> i thought you said two hundred million-300 million. >> know, we are spending about $1 million apiece. this is the tip of the iceberg. this is a conceptual question. is there any thinking about approaches that are not so expensive that may be more affordable? >> let me turn your question a little bit on its head to say that this is actually the more affordable way of going in comparison to many of our other assistance programs, this is still not that large. compared to what we have to deal with in a country that is broken in the case of an iraq or en afghanistan, this is a very small amount. i would underscore, as the president and secretary have, that this is a matter for the international community. there are a lot of countries to have recognized this challenge and shown their commitment with their pocketbooks. it is a difficult time, obviously for us. you could argue that our british friends are on a very
with north korea, the primary responsibility is north korea's. it brought us to this point, and if we are going to move to a better place, it will be up to north korea to demonstrate it is prepared to engage constructively. >> >> that is really up to north korea to take responsibility for any of its actions. we are all trying to interpret what has happened and work collaborative lead to interment -- collaborative leak to determine the best path for. >> to you believe it depends on china? whenever something happens in the region, there the first for consultation. >> we call the six party process because we of the country's that armas significantly affected by and have the ability to shape peace and security in the region. china has a special responsibility. it has been a leader within the six-party process and we will look to china to demonstrate leadership going forward. china has had recent high-level meetings with the north koreans. we will vow to their sharing their perspective with us -- we will value their sharing their specs -- their perspective with us. they have a special role
europeans, they were well educated, emigrating to the u.s.. last year there were only three within the group by participated in. my colleague graduated in u.s., spending $200,000 of her own money on education. she went back to europe, and in these other countries that have no immigration -- no education and the immigration is a policy provided to the u.s.. guest: our population is multifaceted. our program shows that every time a child is given the chance, they can learn. in arkansas there was not much of a european population. all of those kids were achieving. the poverty level was 85%. we are proving again that kids can achieve, given the proper courses and teacher training. host: tom luce, thank you for talking to our viewers. guest: thank you. host: go to our website, c- span.org, to find out the events we are covering today in washington. the president will give his back to school speech at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. a stakeout after meeting with caucus members with mitch mcconnell after the meeting on the small business bill. live coverage on c-span 2. thank you for watching.
is by former u.s. attorney general michael mukasey. again, president obama will have an announcement this afternoon in the white house rose garden. we will have coverage at 1:30 p.m. eastern. until then, an author who has written a book critical of the obama administration. ng this friday, september 17, david limbaugh returns. his latest book is called "crimes against liberty: an indictment of president barack obama." as with the start -- start our discussion, for an author, had a new spirit of the lettuce nonfiction best-seller list. "the new york times" as the book and a number one spot, the second week on the list. "wall street journal" nonfiction, number two. and the combined list of fiction and nonfiction books at "usa today" #28, moving up and not -- #30. why is is selling so well? guest: i think it is resonating. people in america are very scared about what is going on about the bankrupting spending the federal government is doing and the destruction of our liberties and the assaults of individual liberties and assaults on the states, the war against the state, how president o
book "rules for radicals" is still used as a blueprint for social change. >> it defies all the stereotypes of what a rebel rouser is supposed to be. >> nicholas von hoffman writes about his experiences, tonight on c-span's "q & a". >> this week on "prime ministers questions" members return to the house of commons following their summer recess. and the deputy prime minister stood in. the deputy leader faced questioning about the prime minister's communications chief who was accused of tapping into celebrities' voicemail. he also talks about aid to flood victims in pakistan and unemployment benefits. "prime minister's questions" tonight, 9:00 p.m. eastern, on c-span. now a town hall meeting with senator tom coburn. the oklahoma convenient completing his first term in office sean running for re-election. he takes questions on issues of interests to both local residents and a national audience, mainly on health care. this is just over an hour. >> good afternoon. glad you're all here. what we're going to try to do is spend as much time as we can answering questions. the one thin
this is a letter we got from maxim u.s. we're federal services. experts on appeals. medicare hired us to review this file and decide if the partd plan made the correct decision. we work for medicare. we do not work for part-d plan. we appealed and my wife won wholly. so the administrative law judge process. maxim u.s. has appealed that a decision and they say according to the term medically accepted indication includes only fda uses and those off dated uses supported by citation on one of the listed drugs. more over, medically accepted indication does not including treating physician testimony or proffer of medical efforts showing a drug as prescribed effectively treats the condition for which it's being used. converse easily could have included expert testimony as a source material for determining medically accepted uses if he wanted to do so. instead congress by reference to a drugs fda label and expert opinions in one of several drug. accordingly. medical accept the use is not the same as medically necessary. >> i would like to, we worked on issues like that so. we could be of help to you.
their jobs. and today, mr. chairman, they are seeing us stand up for the american manufacturing and american workers and demand a level playing field and an end to china's currency manipulation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from texas. mr. brady: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: mr. speaker, it's now my pleasure, a deep privilege to yield a minute to our distinguished speaker, nancy pelosi. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. the speaker: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank you for the recognition and of yielding of time from the distinguished chairman of the ways and means committee. w and means committee. i think him for bringing this legislation to the floor and i thank mr. murphy -- bipartisan murphys for their leadership in this important legislation. mr. speaker, for so many years, we have watched china-u.s. trade deficit grow and grow and grow. and today, we are finally doing something about it by recognizing that china's manipulation of the currency
city bombing was about half a ton of explosions. nuclear weapons, the unit used is thousands of tons. it takes about 25 truck loads, semitrucks. there have been megaton weapons as well. think about something completely different. do not think in terms of just another explosion. the original five nuclear club was formed. it become clear they were the ones that would control the intent around the world. what if that hadn't happened or suppose we didn't understand all the things we did about notify indication. we maloufed it was possible to make explosions. that took a lost effort to do. what if it had not happened? >> it is a great sport for people not involved in relay history. if discovery hadn't been made, what would the world have been capable of doing without that? my wife hates it because i watch the history channel. there were eight wars by the time i was in middle school. eight strategic wars and vietnam for us. we new world war i left about 20 million people dead. without nuclear weapons, what is the world tapeable of doing in terms of conventional arment. think about world wa
for americans, and find enough support in this body and the congress. it is very important to us, as a country, that we do not leave those markets to our competitors. >> it would be your opinion that the ratification of those agreements would create jobs? >> we have to make sure that we have agreements in place that provide a good deal for american businesses and american workers. where we have strong agreements that meet that test, it will be important for us to make them law. >> with the basel discussion on the capital standards, i want to ask about capital formation. the financial reform bill changed the net worth test for meeting the accredited investors standard. did you support those changes, believing that altering the standards will impact the ability to raise capital and take companies public? >> you are testing my memory of the origin of that provision. i would be happy to look at it in more detail and come back to you. my general view, and i think it is supported by how the broader investment community reacted, is that this will provide a better system for companies to go raise capi
have to give us adequate time to get to the floor so we can respond to the bills and i am recognized and am making a statement because i'm really upset. this is the way the majority has been running the congress, mr. speaker. . you wonder why the american people are upset with majority is because of this. if you don't give adequate notice to the ranking member to be to the floor on bills, people are going to know. you know they are going to know? because i'm going to tell the story. rules matter around this place. now, let me go back to the first bill. the only reason i want to mention this is because i want to thank, you just passed it, we are going to do it by voice, let me tell you what's upsetting. it's the parliamentarian. from the time you drop that bill and the parliamentarian makes sure it gets to the jurisdictions. some might get amended and some other committee thinks they want a view on it. what happens is the majority not giving a doggone about the minority puts bills on this floor no matter what they do so long it's in comfort with someone else. they don't care about the
speaking i would appreciate it. tell us your name and any ebullitions you might have. please wait. we have microphones coming around to you. >> thank you. i am mike billington. i do not know if you went to the conference in quantico last week, but at that conference are raise the exact question you have drawn, the elite of the chinese and russians and others that the evidence is an adequate. the response from different generals as we do not need no stinking evidence. [laughter] look at the provocations, it isn't their character, therefore we have to accept this is true. you did not mention the issue, which has concerned me about this, which is why in this area of very high south korean and u.s. and nato anti-submarine warfare facilities and sonar equipment and so forth there appears to have been no son are evidence whatsoever -- no sonar evidence whatsoever? we all know that north korea said they had nothing to do with this, but i am wondering what you did north korea thinks about this. in other words, who could have done it, who in the west? is that the british? whaty is the view of the n
" reporter andrew zajac. and a discussion on the u.s. labor market with economist j. bradford delong. this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] caller: caller: caller: caller: caller: host: general petraeus, secretary clayton -- glenn beck, among others, agreed that the dove out of reach center should not burn at the koran on the anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks. now we want your opinion whether you see it as a free-speech issue or not. you can see the numbers on the screen this morning. for the first 45 minutes we will be talking about this and going through the newspapers. you can also send us a tweak to -- tweet, tweet certification.com -- twitter.com/c-span-wj. here are a couple of articles about this. it has become headlines everywhere. u.s. embassies brace for karan burning protests. this is from the associated press. governor andate's u.s. embassies around the world preparing. from "the washington examiner" newspaper here in washington -- again, that is in "the washington
with corporations, lobbyists, or anything. it has to do with us. last year i had a chance to go to iraq. i have been there three times and afghanistan twice. i met with a group of people they voted in iraq for the very first time. they stood in line risking their lives for the right to vote in the election. you know what? if the people of orange beach and gulf shores had to stand in the three-mile long bond to vote, it would not be 24%, it might not even before%. -- the 4%. no one controls your government when the american people take their government back. the best way to do that is to be active. i would give anything -- let's take this coming election, november 2, drive around the streets of orange beach. see how many people have a yard sign in their yard. have a bumper sticker on their car. wear a button to the grocery store. that with all due respect is the best way to keep america on the track we want it to go on. it is not just to say to limit this -- and i agree with you. we need to limit outside influence especially if it is not being reported. but the better ways to make sure that the peopl
of the conversations over the weekend. for us, it was less about -- and i understand all of the noise about crisis and bailout and morale hazard. lehman had the capital. we needed the liquidity. we had four -- we went into that last weekwith over $40 billion of liquidity, we lost close to 30 in three days. we needed the liquidity. i really cannot answer you, sir, as to why the federal reserve and the treasury and the sec together chose to not only provide support for liquidity, but also not to have opened the window to lehman that sunday night as it did to all of our competitors. i must tell you when i first heard about the fact that the window was open for expanded collateral, a number of my finance and treasury team came into my offense -- office and said we're fine. we have the collateral. we can pledge it. we're fine. 45 minutes later, they came back and said, that window is not open to lehman brothers. >> yes, that is in the chronology. all right. mr. baxter, let me follow up on this. in addition to the -- did you see political considerations in the timeline? you see the debate about the fina
very much for joining us. >> thank you. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> for a dvd copy of this program, call 1-877-662-7726. for free transcripts or to give us your comments about this program, visit us at q-and- a.org. "q&a" programs are also available as podcasts. >> next on "prime minister's questions," dip the prime minister -- deputy prime minister nick clegg stands in for david cameron. following that, a colorado senate debate. tomorrow on "washington journal," a look at what congress plans to do before the november 2 election with david hawkings from cq. then, colin kahl and michelle mello. that is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. >> but, honestly, i am not going to take this from a party, from a party, that has spent all of its time in office backbiting against each other through leaks to the press, a party of the dossier of damion mcbride. a little bit of consistency on this, shall we? >> now, from london, "prime minister's questions" from the british house of commons. ministers
. it mandates that funds provided by the legislation shall be used to supplement and not to supplant other energy efficiency funding. it says that no report has to be filed with the comptroller general regardling the extent to which funds provided by the legislation that are used to support commercial or industrial energy measures. it prohibits any additions to direct spending with respect to the legislation. it forbids funds from being used to purchase personal property, including manufactured homes but allows funds to be used for modifications to manufactured homes. . it prohibits regulations regarding a home labeling program, it also prohibits the wrongful use or diversion of program funds, as well as prohibits providing funds to any contract who are employs any person who has been convicted of or pled guilty to any form of sexual assault. finally it prohibits federal employees from receiving loan fund fs they have seriously delinquent tax debt, have received a payment in violation of the liheap or have been officially disciplined for viewing, downloading or exchanging pornography on fe
deserved for being a phenomenal leader and the u.s. congress for three decades, who's sitting right here in the front row. and i've just got to say how much all of it congressman phil crane has done for the cause. [applause] [alause] i've got to say one of the really early thrilled by head when i was enacted in politics as a young guy with cp had a guest there wasa young republican national convention in new orleans where i'm from and standing on a riverboat going down the river and congressman crane was there and was so approachable and he will remember it come up and i remember it to this day comes thathey're talking to me for the longest time, drinking a beer as if he had nothing better to do than talk to this college kid. and again, thank you, congressman crane. [applause] also one other shout out. my fellow yaf word member at georgetown university in the mid-80's and fellow fresan dorm for who we were in the same freshman dorm for, fellow iter, he is fed by a heck of a lot more people across this country than i did and is done great things to the conservative cause. my friend tried
're document, and engaging in a discussion. here are the phone numbers. if you are a democrat, join us. rep conditions, join us, and independents, join us. good morning once again, this is the kind of discussion i can promise you would only happen on c-span. 34 years ago we used to call us the place where the constitution came to live every day, because it gave you a running example of the three branches of government and the live coverage of the congress, executive branch and what we told you about the supreme court so we couldn't let constitution day go by without a discussion. seems like we're hearing more and more about it these days, and on the front page of the washington times in a story about constitution day, david eisner who runs the national constitution center in philadelphia explains why. here is the story. he writes -- the tea party has got people thinking more seriously about what's in the constitution and what's not. that's the quote from the political analyst with american enterprise institute but they say it would be wrong to assume tea party movement was -- >> supreme cou
think someone can come up with the exact figure, and all of the resources being used for a human destruction, why can they not be used to improve the quality of life, living conditions, and the structure, and given a future to the people of india? [unintelligible] this mahomet gandhi was alive today, what kind of device which he did to the indian leadership? >> we will take that as a comment, not a question. [laughter] the gentleman in the back. >> we are prisoners of the past. when you talk about military, there are at least two wars in the past. we have to project that in a linear fashion. i would like you to comment on the macro side in the sense that the borders were imposed by the british on the locals. the chinese border was [unintelligible] then, [unintelligible] acted on his temper, winston churchill -- and his emperor, winston churchill. why is this border so solid? secondly, on pakistan, you have an enormous tragedy. what are the opportunities for the bigger the deal maker? >> let me comment on that, not the last part, because we are still discovering what is happening
give his perspective on the challenges facing u.s. cities and later, steve capt. talks about banking rules for the industry. from the nation's capital, this is "washington journal." host: good morning. it is friday, september 24, 2010 and you are watching "washington journal" and you can see it is a foggy morning here at the nation's capital. the senate yesterday, they managed to deliver a small business bill to the president. if they decided to delay the tax debate until after the election and on campaign finance, the republicans managed to turn down a movement that would have addressed the citizens united decision for the supreme court. we will be talking about a lot of issues this morning, including the house gop pledge to america. and there will be a discussion of disclosure laws for mortgages. we will begin with a discussion about the baby boom generation there is an article in the atlantic, can the baby boomers ?edeem their generation .. and our numbers are on the screen. we will get to your calls and questions in just a few minutes. let me show you the cover of the "at
in one million foreigners a year into our country legally. nobody can match us. nobody can come close in the entire world. the united states opens our doors to a million people to follow the rules and come into this country. yes, you can call it compassion, but it is random compassion. who said these people, determined by the white house, are more deserving of compassion than these people over here because we've got, according to most of the estimates, between 12 million and 20 million of these people in our country. so, why -- who decides and who picks those 17,000? and are we starting a policy that everybody that's awaiting a hearing in a immigration court will just be excused? is that the new policy? so 17,000 is just a start? i don't know, we don't have an answer to that. but the real question we have to be concerned about is, who made the executive branch so independent to operate that they can shut down things like drilling in the gulf and turn loose people who have pending court cases on their say-so? without any consultation or action by the legislative branch of the governmen
nuclear arms reduction treaty. >> with the house and senate back in session, follow congress using the c-span 2 libraries -- using the c-span video library. it is a great resource for anyone who uses the library. >> the imam leading the effort to build a summit center near ground zero says he is surprised by the controversy surrounding the plan. from the scalp -- from the council on foreign plans in new york city, this is one hour. >> good morning. people, please take your seats. welcome to the council on foreign relations. my name is richard hoss and i am the president of this organization. today, as you all know, we are hosting feisal abdul rauf, who is the founder and ceo for the american society for muslim advancement. he is also the imam, which i expect you all know, for the mosque here in new york city. that is, however, only part of who we is. he is the founder and chair of the cordova initiative dedicated to building bridges between the muslim and non-muslim world. he is also essential to plans for the building to the new islamic community center to be built adjacent to ground ze
to certain entities that will use the funds to make loans to consumers to implement energy efficient measures involving structural improvements and investments in cost effective commercial off-the-shelf technologies to improve home energy use. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. mr. arcuri: thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from nebraska rise? >> request permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. fortenberry: mr. speaker, he was called a young man of integrity and respect, a great marine who loved the marine corps, a loving husband and father. this is how the late staff sergeant michael a. bach was remembered by those who knew him. he was conducting operations in the hellman province in afghanistan when his patrol came under fire and died from those injuries on august 13. he had served four deployments in beeth iraq and afghanistan and was awarded the purple heart, navy and marine corps achie
for years and they have elected me to that. >> in new hampshire -- >> u.s. civil rights commission is holding a conference on civil rights in the 21st century and includes speeches and panel discussions on various aspects. business leaders and scholars discuss the legal and social tools available for fighting discrimination. >> including continued racial and ethnic disparities in important measures of well-being and success. this discussion obviously includes a consideration of public policy options, both old and new, but it goes beyond public policy by also asking about the limits of government action and what the right mix of government and nongovernment action should be. in a pre-conference conference call with the panel members, we identified the following questions as relevant. they don't have to answer them all, but i'm going to repeat them anyway and if they go off on more brilliant things i might turn them back to a few of these questions. first, beyond rigorous enforcement of anti-discrimination law, ca can and should be done by government to narrow racial and ethnic dispa
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